About AngelaFurtado1

I am a corporate communications specialist and amateur photographer living in Los Angeles, California. You can visit my blogs at: https://shootngo.wordpress.com and http://discoveringla.wordpress.com

Thursday Doors – 08/15/2019

Doors from a small town in Northeast Brazil. We spent the month of July in Brazil and one of the things we did was to participate in a reunion of my husband’s family, on his father’s side. Among other things, we visited the small town of Campo Maior, where his family came from.

For Norm’s Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors – June 20, 2019

A week or so ago I went out to photograph the Jacaranda trees that were in full bloom here is Los Angeles. Instead of going to the beautiful streets of Beverly Hills, where photographers are not always welcomed, I chose a quiet little street in West LA, lined up with Jacarandas on both sides. Much to my surprise, the jacarandas were not the only attraction there. Every house had a colorful, interesting door, even the most modest ones. So that tuned into a door photo shoot too. 

Lens-Artists Challenge: Trees

The Trees of Los Angeles

1. Jacarandas – There are lots of Jacaranda trees in L.A. Most of them are Jacaranda mimosifolia, one of 49 different types of flowering jacaranda trees. The Mimosifolia is a sub-tropical tree native to south-central South America. They can be found all over Los Angeles and typically bloom in May/June.

2. The Coastal Coral tree is the official tree of the city of Los Angeles, California. This tree is a tropical that has a spreading multiple trunk habit that often spans or exceeds its height, which may reach fifty feet. The tree is prized in gardens for its beautiful orange summer flowers.

3. Australian Moreton Fig trees can be found all over Los Angeles. The huge fig tree in the photo below is in a central location in Beverly Hills. It was planted by an Australian in the 19th century.

4. Tipuana Tipu, also known as Tipa, Rosewood and Pride of Bolivia, is a South American tree found all around Los Angeles. They can grow as high as 50 to 70 feet tall by over 100 feet wide. Our very own Tipa (below) is a good example of that, completely dwarfing our house. It is close to 100-years-old.

5. Eucaliptus Trees are indigenous to Tasmania and southeastern Australia, but are very common in Los Angeles. California is best acquainted with Eucalyptus Globulus, also known as the blue gum. The tree is instantly recognizable by its minty scent.

6. Palm Trees – Last but certainly not least, Palm Trees are the quintessential symbols of Los Angeles.. California’s eighteenth century Franciscan missionaries were the first to plant palms ornamentally. But it was not until Southern California’s turn-of-the-twentieth-century gardening craze that the region’s leisure class introduced the palm as the region’s preeminent decorative plant. Providing neither shade nor marketable fruit, the palm was entirely ornamental. They are both loved and hated by the locals.

In response to Lens-Artists photo challenge: Trees 

Thursday Doors – June 13, 2018

~~ The Doors of Hagia Sophia (Ayasofya), Istanbul, Turkey ~~

Built in AD 537, at the beginning of the Middle Ages, Hagia Sophia is a former Greek Orthodox Christian cathedral. When Constantinople was conquered by the Ottoman Empire in 1453, the cathedral was converted into a mosque. At that point, the bells, altar, iconostasis, and other relics were destroyed. Mosaics depicting Jesus, Mary, Christian saints, and angels were destroyed or plastered over. Hagia Sophia remained a mosque until 1931 and after being closed to the public for four years, it re-opened in 1935 as a museum by the Republic of Turkey. Hagia Sophia is considered the epitome of Byzantine architecture and is said to have “changed the history of architecture.”

Hagia Sophia Cathedral/Museum

Main Door (one of the entrances to the building)

The Narthex (below) is the entry space for worship, a space where worshippers would gather before and after service.

The Emperor Door (below), the largest door of Hagia Sophia, provides passage to the main structure from the inner narthex section. The Emperor door is 7 meters high and made of oak, with a bronze frame. It’s called the Emperor door because only the Emperor could pass through it on special occasions. The mosaic on top dates back to the 9 or 10th century. It depicts Emperor Leo VI with a halo over his head, giving proskynesis, an act of respect – to Christ, who is sitting on a jeweled throne. With his right hand, Christ is blessing the emperor, and his left hand is holding a book written “Peace be with you.”

Hagia Sophia Library – built by Sultan Mahmud I in 1739.Library Doors

Other Internal Doors. There are other more interesting doors in Hagia Sophia, but with so much to see, and the crowd, I missed them… 😦

Shots of the cathedral.For Norm’s Thursday Doors.